Gnostic Doctrine

Wednesday, 6 March 2019

The Story of Mary Magdalene and the First Easter Egg

The Story of Mary Magdalene and the First Easter Egg

Image result for mary magdalene easter egg greek orthodox church


Jehovah's Witnesses claim that the Easter egg is a pagan symbol

The Easter egg in Christian tradition has a much humbler origin, and nothing to do with ancient pagan practices

One tradition concerning Mary Magdalene says that following the death and resurrection of Jesus, she used her position to gain an invitation to a banquet given by the Roman Emperor Tiberius.

Her purpose was to protest to him that his governor in Judea, Pontius Pilate, and the two high priests, had conspired and executed an innocent man, namely our Lord Jesus Christ.

According to this tradition, after the Ascension of Jesus, Mary went to the Emperor of Rome and greeted him with "Christ has risen," whereupon he pointed to an egg on his table and stated, "Christ has no more risen than that egg is red." After making this statement it is said the egg immediately turned blood red

This tradition of Mary Magdalene visiting Caesar Tiberius can be found in the Gospel of Nicodemus but it does not mention eggs:

Mary Magdalene said, weeping: Hear, O peoples, tribes, and tongues, and learn to what death the lawless Jews have delivered Him Who did them ten thousand good deeds. Hear, and be astonished. Who will let these things be heard by all the world? I shall go alone to Rome, to the Caesar. I shall show him what evil Pilate hath done in obeying the lawless Jews. (the Gospel of Nicodemus)

This she did. Going to Tiberius, she handed him an egg, saying: “Christ is risen.” It was the custom to give gifts to Caesar, but usually not something like an egg! Tiberius would not take the egg, but asked to know why she had offered it to him. Saint Mary explained that just as life is in an egg, so Christ the Life lay in the tomb. And as the chick breaks out of the “stone” of the shell, so Jesus came forth from the stone tomb in triumph over death. Taken aback, Tiberius demanded a sign that her words were true. Instantly the egg turned scarlet in Saint Mary’s hand, and she then spoke of Christ granting life through the shedding of His blood. It is from this incident that we have the custom of Easter eggs, which in the Eastern Churches are always bright red.

Learning of this offering by Mary Magdalene, the early Christians imitated her, presenting each other with eggs. Hence, eggs began to be used by Christians in the earliest centuries as a symbol of the Resurrection of Christ and of the regeneration of Christians for a new and a better life along with it.

For Orthodox Christians, the egg symbolizes the empty rock tomb from which Jesus Christ arose after Ηis Crucifixion.

Consider the following words from the Catholic Encyclopedia: “Because the use of eggs was forbidden during Lent, they were brought to the table on Easter Day, colored red to symbolize the Easter joy. This custom is found not only in the Latin but also in the Oriental Churches.”



Traditionally, Easter eggs are dyed throughout the Orthodox Christian world on Holy Thursday, and they are dyed red to represent the redeeming blood of Christ that was shed on the Cross, the white egg (before being dyed) represents the white marble tomb were Christ's body was laid after He was taken down from the Cross, and the hard shell of the egg symbolises the sealed tomb of Christ

Easter--The awakening and raising to spiritual consciousness of the divine mind in man, which has been dead in trespasses and sins and buried in the tomb of materiality.

No comments:

Post a Comment